World’s largest zombie gathering

Saturday, Oct 5, 2013, marked the World’s Largest Gathering of Zombies by Guinness World Record™. It all went down on the Asbury Park Boardwalk in New Jersey. 9,592 undead turned out for the NJ Zombie Walk to reclaim the title from the current record breaking event which took place at the 8th annual The Zombie Pub Crawl in Minneapolis, Minnesota at Midway Stadium on Oct 13, 2012.
nj zombie walk 2013 record breaking photo
screen shot take from njzombiewalk.com
Unfortunately, I didn’t make it there before the gates closed for counting but I was definitely there in spirit and in costume. My boyfriend, who had taken classes in special effects and has always been inspired by the work of Tom Savini (Dawn of The Dead, etc.), decided it would be fun if he got me into character for the event. He hadn’t done makeup in a while so it was partly experimentation, but we both enjoyed the process and transformation and had a lot of fun taking pics.

THE TOOLS

makeup tools laid out on bed
Tools used for the makeup included: bottle of liquid latex, fake red and black blood, ben nye products, paint brushes, cotton balls, eyeliner, stipple sponge, baby oil/mineral oil, elmer’s glue stick, rubbing alcohol.
various paint brushes used for makeup various markers used for makeup fake blood and other makeup tools makeup tools laid out on bed makeup tools laid out on bed

THE PROCESS

latex and cotton application to build up features
latex and cotton application to build up features

black makeup application around eyes and mouth first layer of makeup and detailing mean zombie face

close up of zombie face
I purchased fake zombie teeth to enhance the effect. They’re a little clunky but funny looking.
latex on hands
We added nails and covered my hands really quick just to help them match my face. By the time we got to the boardwalk it was already peeling.

latex makeup mask in full zombie makeup on the street

 

latex makeup mask
The grease makeup prevented the latex from sticking to every part of my face. By the time the night was over, I just cut the mask in half and peeled it off my face, leaving only the edges.

latex makeup mask

after makeup/latex is removed
the latex peeled off, but getting it off my hairline and neck took time. I used uni-solve (used in hospitals) and it worked great. The green around my mouth is food coloring that I used to darken my teeth and the edges of my skin underneath the latex.

On the Star Wars Front

If I didn’t know any better, I’d assume that a new Star Wars movie was on the horizon. It seems that every day or so, I come across something on the web or receive an email about SW news or related creativity. I subscribe to DesignTAXI, a news and editorial site that is updated daily with inspired creativity and innovation. Just looking back to my emails from February, I count about 15 messages related in some way to Star Wars. Most of the articles are pretty enjoyable as it’s interesting to see how someone has yet again reinvented the cult classic. I’ve watched the first 3 movies and can’t remember much of either except the famous scenes that people can recite by heart. Yet, growing up in the 80s, I will always have affection for the trilogy. And so to keep that nostalgia alive, I’ve compiled some of the more enjoyable Star Wars-related pieces that I’ve found from DesignTAXI and elsewhere in the universe. Click on the titles/photos to read the full article.

Darth Vader As Don Draper?

Reimagination of ‘Star Wars’ Characters As Samurai

‘Star Wars’ Characters In Various Yoga Poses

LEGO Releases Official Ultimate Collector’s ‘Star Wars’ R2-D2 Set

What Happens When ‘Star Wars’ Characters Meet Zombies?

‘Star Wars’ Condoms Offer Full Protection Of ‘The Force’

Teach The Alphabet To Your Child With ‘Star Wars’ Characters

When ‘Star Wars’ Meets Steampunk

‘Star Wars’ Propaganda Posters

LucasArts Reveals ‘Star Wars 1313’

‘Star Wars’ Shower Mosaic

If Dr Seuss Did ‘Star Wars’

‘Before Star Wars’, Vintage Photos of Darth Vader And Co.

Official ‘Star Wars’ iPhone Case To Be Released

‘Star Wars’ Flash Drives

Darth Vader Hot Air Balloon

What Happened To The ‘Star Wars’ That We Used To Know?

Iconic Images Redone with ‘Star Wars’ Action Figures

‘Star Wars’ Brand Wars

‘Star Wars’ Swimsuits for the Ultimate Geek Girls

‘Star Wars’ Fans Save Luke Skywalker’s Home

Tattoos For Badass ‘Star Wars’ Fans

art deco + urban + zombies = BIOSHOCK

For those of you who are not video game aficionados, like myself, BioShock is a survival horror first-person shooter with role-playing game customization and stealth elements. The game, set in an alternate 1960, but is stylized from the 1920s art deco era, puts the player in the role of a plane crash survivor named Jack, who must explore the underwater city of Rapture, and survive attacks by the mutated beings and mechanical drones that populate it. (wikipedia)

I’ve never actually played the game – I first saw it a few years back, while I was watching a friend play it. But I always remembered it because of the first impression it gave me.  The music was eerie, like something out of The Shining. The phonographs will occasionally play music from the 1930s, 40s and 50s. The mechanics of the zombies remind me of the movie 28 Days Later. But the best and most memorable aspect of the game is the design.  The posters and signs look like something from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis. And I especially loved the steam punk inspired characters.

The game has received critical acclaim for its design, and is now being featured in the Smithsonian’s Art of Video Games Exhibit running from March 16, 2012 – September 30, 2012. Irrational Games’ BioShock was one of 240 video games nominated for the exhibit, and became one of the top 80 currently displayed at the museum. To view the full list of games, click here.

“In addition to the 80 games . . . . five playable games will be included in the exhibition: Pac-Man, Super Mario Brothers, The Secret of Monkey Island, Myst, and Flower.” Go to the Smithsonian’s site to download the The Art of Video Games Exhibition Checklist, which features screen shots of classic games like Pac-Man and Donkey Kong, amongst many others.

The museum describes the exhibit as one of the first exhibitions to explore the forty-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, with a focus on striking visual effects and the creative use of new technologies. It features some of the most influential artists and designers during five eras of game technology, from early pioneers to contemporary designers.”